Posts Tagged Attitude

Do You Embrace Constructive Feedback?

Direction for Improvement

Direction for Improvement

 

 

Do You Embrace Constructive Feedback?

I’ve read a number of articles recently that profess that constructive feedback fails to improve people’s performance the vast majority of time.  And others even say that all constructive feedback is destructive and an oxymoron.  Really?  I could not disagree more.

Consider this quote from a past article by Mark Murphy, CEO of Leadership IQ. Employees need a lot more feedback about their performance. According to a new study by Leadership IQ, 51% of employees don’t know whether their performance is where it should be. That’s pretty shocking, so I’ll say it again: We asked 3,611 workers across 291 companies to respond to a series of survey questions, including the question “I know whether my job performance is where it should be.” The results? 51% Disagreed while only 21% Agreed (27% were in the middle).

Successful people not only want constructive feedback on their performance, they embrace it.  They know constructive feedback will help them repeat good performance, identify areas for improvement, and help them grow and reach their career goals.  When your performance consistently improves, so does your future.

Now don’t get me wrong. Constructive feedback can be delivered poorly and have the opposite impact than was intended.  When this happens usually the person giving the feedback tries to ease into areas for improvement by sugarcoating the feedback or starting with a positive feedback that finishes with a “but” and an area for improvement.  That’s why I always encourage people to do an honest self-assessment before any formal feedback session.  Then concentrate only on positive items or areas for improvement that were significantly different from your self-assessment.

All of us should embrace constructive feedback.  And if you are responsible for giving constructive feedback, learn how to properly deliver feedback and give it frequently.

Update May 18:  Even Bill Gates agrees – http://www.inc.com/jana-kasperkevic/bill-gates-proper-feedback-is-key-to-improvement.html

 

 



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Is Your Attitude Squashing You?

Attitude Squashing You?

Attitude Squashing You?

 

 

Is YOUR Attitude Squashing YOU?

 

Do people frequently attribute any of these sayings to describe you at home and/or work – reactive, pessimistic, downer, cynical, defeatist, or grumpy?  If so, your attitude IS squashing you!

Simply put by Coach Lou Holtz – “Ability is what you’re capable of doing. Motivation determines what you do. Attitude determines how well you do it.”

A person’s attitude is their affinity or inclination to respond in positive or negative ways to events, ideas, objects, people, organizations, etc.  A person’s attitude influences their choice of action, and responses to other people, opportunities, challenges, consequences, rewards, and situations.  The key is YOU get to choose your attitude – it does not choose you!

In my experience people exhibit/choose 3 basic attitudes:

 

  1. Explorer – People with an Explorer attitude are proactive participants in life and work, and thrive on opportunities brought on by change.  They take calculated risks and over deliver on their commitments.  They are consistently enthusiastic and energetic people, and their attitude is contagious to other Explorers and some Followers. Explorers look at the ‘glass as half full’, and have what Stephen Covey calls an ‘abundance mentality’.
  2. Follower – People with a Follower attitude are the reactive spectators of life and work, and are usually reluctant to adapt to change. They rarely take risks and are uncomfortable making commitments, instead relying on others to make major decisions and commitments.  Followers need motivating to deliver on commitments, otherwise they tend to coast. Followers see Explorers as successful and may seek them out, and want to work with them.  They also can be negatively motivated by Cynics.
  3. Cynic – People with Cynic attitudes are the victims and carpers of life and work and are annoyed by change.  They are sarcastic and pessimistic people that can drain the energy out of other people, teams or organizations.  They believe risks and commitments are forced on them by others.  And when difficulties arise, they enjoy being ‘told you so’ critics and finding fault, after the fact, in efforts, results and people.  Cynics many times resent the success of others and have what Stephen Covey calls a ‘scarcity mentality’.

Most people demonstrate some of all three attitudes and choose different attitudes based on varying situations and events, but one attitude tends to dominate in each of us.  So if your attitude is squashing you, even occasionally, what can you do?

  1. Reflect On Your Attitude and Honestly Assess It
    1. Self-assessment
    2. Trusted colleagues, friends and family assessment
    3. Admit Your Barriers, and Drivers.
      1. Dominant attitude
      2. Situational attitudes
      3. Barriers to a better attitude
      4. Drivers to a better attitude
      5. Determine Probable Root Causes of Your Barriers
        1. Causes you control
        2. Situational causes
        3. Physical and mental causes
        4. Commit To Make Changes In Your Attitude
          1. Reduce or eliminate cynics in your life
          2. Set short-term goals
          3. Measure goal achievement
          4. Set new short-term goals
          5. Seek outside help, if needed
          6. Put Some Gratitude in Your Attitude

Remember, you choose your attitude – it does not choose you.

 



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Habits for a Successful Career – Habit #5

Put Gratitude in Your Attitude

Put Gratitude in Your Attitude

 

Habits of a Successful Career

Habit #5 – Put Some Gratitude in Your Attitude

Successful people are consistently enthusiastic and energetic, and their attitude is contagious.  Others seek out, and want to work with people with this attitude. Pessimistic people can drain the entire energy out of a team or organization.  Pick the people you are close with cautiously, and cultivate others showing gratitude in their attitude as team members, colleagues, mentors, coaches, etc.

People with this attitude also look at the ‘glass as half full’, and have what Stephen Covey called an ‘abundance mentality’.  Some companies, like Southwest Airlines, boast that they ‘hire for attitude and train for skills’.

Remember no matter how much success a person achieves: (1) never take yourself too seriously; (2) be a team player; (3) have fun; and (4) celebrate other’s successes.

 



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